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Press Release

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Title
Leicester’s Hospitals launch the country’s first dedicated Emergency Department based Sepsis Team
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Press release date06/02/2017
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Summary
From Monday 6 February Leicester’s Hospitals are launching the country’s first dedicated Emergency Department based Sepsis Team.
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Press release

We are leading the way as no other NHS trust in the UK has a dedicated team for the recognition and management of sepsis within an Emergency Department.


The aim of the team is to strengthen the response in a timely manner to those patients who present to the Emergency Department with Sepsis or who go on to deteriorate within the department.  


Sepsis is caused by the way the body responds to germs, such as bacteria, getting into your body. The infection may have started anywhere in a sufferer’s body, and may be only in one part of the body or it may be widespread. Sepsis can occur following chest or water infections, problems in the abdomen like burst ulcers, or simple skin injuries like cuts and bites.


The team is made up of healthcare professionals from a variety of backgrounds including intensive and critical care, emergency medicine and theatres. 


John Parker, Lead Consultant at Leicester’s Hospitals said “Following release of ‘Time to Act’(2013) the Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman report  we have put in place a sepsis improvement project, to raise the awareness of sepsis amongst our staff and to improve the management of septic patients across our hospitals.


“The project started in early 2014 when we formed a ‘Sepsis Awareness’ group, bringing a variety of healthcare professionals together, led by myself and Sepsis Lead Specialist Nurse Sarah Odams.


“Since then we have:


•written a bespoke ‘Sepsis Adult Screening & Immediate Action’ pathway which has been shared with staff across our hospitals in line with NICE (National Institute for National for Health and Care Excellence) and the UK Sepsis Trust


•developed a range of training for our staff, primarily face-to-face and we will shortly have an e-learning package available.  Sepsis Awareness training is now mandatory for our staff


•carried out regular surveillance audits to make sure that staff are compliant with the care pathway. We have seen an improvement in the numbers of patients being given IV antibiotics and fluids within an hour as recommended by NHS England.  Recognition of sepsis across the trust is now at 95-100%.


“With funding from the NHS Litigation Authority our new dedicated Sepsis Team will be in our Emergency Department where two thirds of our patients present with the symptoms of sepsis. On an average day there could be between five and ten people coming into the Emergency Department with potentially life threatening sepsis”. 


“The team will support the Emergency Team to recognise and immediate treat anyone who we suspect has sepsis.  They will then help make sure that patient gets the right care from emergency surgery to intensive care support.”


Commenting on her new role Clair Ripley, Sepsis Practitioner said “I started my nursing career working on the Infectious Diseases Unit before moving into Critical Care nursing. After working in Critical Care for four years I decided to join the Sepsis Team. I’m excited to drive forward excellence in the care of septic and deteriorating patients in our ED and across the rest of our organisation.”


ENDS


Note to Editors:


What is Sepsis?

Sepsis is caused by the way the body responds to germs, such as bacteria, getting into your body. The infection may have started anywhere in a sufferer’s body, and may be only in one part of the body or it may be widespread. Sepsis can occur following chest or water infections, problems in the abdomen like burst ulcers, or simple skin injuries like cuts and bites.


Sepsis is a life threatening condition that arises when the body’s response to an infection injures its own tissues and organs. Sepsis leads to shock, multiple organ failure and death especially if not recognised early and treated promptly.


What are the signs of Sepsis (adult)?


Seek medical help urgently if you develop any one of the following:


Slurred speech

Extreme shivering or muscle pain

Passing no urine (in a day)

Severe breathlessness

“I feel like I might die”

Skin mottled or discoloured


For further information contact The Sepsis Trust   www.sepsistrust.org


Contact information:
Contact information
For media enquiries please contact:
Clare Maddison
Communications Officer
clare.maddison@uhl-tr.nhs.uk
0116 258 8761
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Press release number
6281
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