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#UHL2Kenya2018

Elloy Thompson Kenya visit
Paediatric Ear, Nose and Throat Consultant - Marianne Elloy and Emergency Department Deputy Sister - Sue Thompson are about to embark on a trip of a lifetime. Both have been selected by the Army (2 Medical Regiment) to go to Askari Serpent in Kenya. They fly on 3 May for a week and will spend that time working with colleagues in the Army providing medical support to the people of Kenya.


Read the full press release here: http://www.leicestershospitals.nhs.uk/aboutus/our-news/press-release-centre/?entryid8=58376

Follow the hashtag #UHL2Kenya2018 on Twitter

 



See Marianne and Sue's progress with the blog below: 

Friday 4 May:

Sue & Marianne arrived yesterday in Nanuyki, a market town north-west of Mount Kenya. On their journey they saw the lush, tropical greenery which is abundant due to the recent heavy rains. The country has been experiencing extensive flooding which is impacting on agriculture. They experienced this first hand when a portion of the road was flooded and the fast flowing water had swept lorries off the road - thankfully their skilled drivers safely navigated these hazards. 

They were welcomed and orientated by the Commanding Officer and his team who shared the activities they have planned as part of the work that medical Regiment 2 has been carrying out.


Sue & Marianne arrived yesterday in Nanuyki, a market town NW of Mount Kenya. On their journey they saw the lush, tropical greenery which is abundant due to the recent heavy rains & extensive flooding which is impacting agriculture
Sue & Marianne arrived yesterday in Nanuyki, a market town NW of Mount Kenya.


Saturday 5 May:

Following a briefing at the medical regiment base where Exercise Askaris is been coordinated, Sue and Marianne set out on a mission to visit the Winds of Hope Orphanage in Isiolo to visit an amazing charity with truly inspiring staff who care for and treat children who have been affected by drugs and HIV.

The medical regiment provide a community engagement project and today the team consisted of a nurse, dentist, environmental health officer, RAF physiotherapist and support staff.  They provided some education, advice and support on dental hygiene, sexual health and infection prevention. Alongside this an exercise class and the team had organised games.  Afterwards the children entertained us with music, singing and dancing and we joined in and had fun.

Sue: “It was so obvious to see that there was a mutual benefit not only for the children who will be able to make more positive changes to their life and gain hope for the future, but also to the medical regiment who gain a rewarding experience but also personal and emotional development. It was apparent that this work which is carried out around the world is an extremely part of their career.”


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If you are interested about further information about joining the Army Reserve please call 0345 600 8080
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A portion of the road was flooded and the fast flowing water had swept lorries off the road


Sunday 6 May & Monday 7 May:

Whilst we were all enjoying the glorious Bank Holiday weekend, Sue and Marianne visited a remote temporary medical facility and the Mount Kenya Animal Orphanage.

The temporary medical facility was set up by 2 Medical Regiment for 5 days in a remote area called Dol Dol, where the team is working collaboratively with the local cottage hospital to provide basic medical care of the local population treating around 70 patients a day. 

They have seen a wide range of conditions, including musculoskeletal and respiratory problems and even the birth of a baby!

The care is provided by combat medical technicians, doctors, nurses and dentists who are living on site from the duration of the exercise. These professionals are from both the Regular Army (full time) and Army Reserve (part time). The exercise not only benefits the local population with access to health care but also the development of the staff involved. 

Marianne: “The Army Reserves we spoke to felt the experience had help them to build confidence to advance their non military careers, seek new professional development opportunities and develop their personal skills. It was clear to see that the experience was of benefit to all involved.”

Sue: “Getting to this remote location gave us a unique experience of rural Kenya with amazing vistas of the mountains and plains with an abundance of wildlife which was a privilege to experience.”

At the Mount Kenya Animal Orphanage they focus on rehabilitation of injured animals and breeding endangered species. There is a particular focus on supporting the mountain bongo (a rare type of antelope) which has only 100 left in the wild. 

Regular and reserve soldiers from BATUK (the British Army training group in Kenya) support this as a community engagement project. They have supplied labour and materials for building projects and members of the team volunteer to help care for the animals. 

Marianne: “It was fascinating to see and interact with a wide range of unusual and rare animals who are being rehabilitated to return to the wild. On our return, we had the opportunity to stand on the equator and witness the Coriolis effect.”

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They were welcomed and orientated by the Commanding Officer and his team
Marianne: “It was fascinating to see and interact with a wide range of unusual and rare animals who are being rehabilitated to return to the wild."
Marianne: “It was fascinating to see and interact with a wide range of unusual and rare animals who are being rehabilitated to return to the wild."
At the Mount Kenya Animal Orphanage they focus on rehabilitation of injured animals and breeding endangered species.
At the Mount Kenya Animal Orphanage they focus on rehabilitation of injured animals and breeding endangered species.


Marianne & Sue have now returned from Kenya.

Sue said: "Sadly our journey has come to an end and indeed it was the journey of a lifetime. The last two days involved a final debrief and goodbyes at 2 Med Reg Headquarters and then an overnight stay at Kifaru camp where BATUK have a base.  An early and long flight back to the UK gave us much time to reflect. Despite the daily challenges the Kenyan people endure we witnessed a warm welcome and embracement of the work 2 Med Reg and other MOD staff carry out. From their help at the community engagement projects at the Winds of Hope Orphanage, Mount Kenya Animal Orphanage and the Rural Treatment Centres it was clear to see the desire they all have to make things better.”

Marianne: “We have been witness to a team of dedicated, passionate, organised and professional individuals on our journey.  We experienced displays of dignity, integrity and camaraderie. On home territory we can look back and be grateful for what we have, and quite often take for granted. We have nothing but admiration for those who work to improve things for others on projects like Exercise Askaris in Kenya, and other projects like them around the world.”

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Despite the daily challenges the Kenyan people endure we witnessed a warm welcome and embracement of the work 2 Med Reg and other MOD staff carry out
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We have been witness to a team of dedicated, passionate, organised and professional individuals on our journey.
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The journey has come to an end and indeed it was the journey of a lifetime


What is the Coriolis effect?  As Kenya is on the Equator, which divides the northern and southern hemispheres of our planet, Sue and Marianne would have witnessed something quite unusual. The Coriolis effect is, in short, where you will see a movement clockwise in the Northern Hemisphere , and the movement counter-clockwise in the Southern Hemisphere.

If you are interested about further information about joining the Army Reserve please call 0345 600 8080 or visit http://apply.army.mod.uk/what-we-offer/reserve-soldier