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Press Release

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Title
Leicester research team show that heart attack procedure reduces risk of further complications
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Press release date01/09/2014
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Summary
A new study led by a research team at Glenfield Hospital in Leicester has revealed that treating heart attack patients who have two or three narrowed arteries with additional stents, reduces major complications within 12 months by more than 50%.
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Press release
The research team, led by Professor Tony Gershlick, Consultant Cardiologist at Leicester’s Hospitals and Professor of Interventional Cardiology at the University of Leicester, randomised 296 heart attack patients to two arms of the study. The first arm meant that patients had only the artery that caused the heart attack unblocked, and the second arm had the same whilst stenting other incidental narrowed arteries.

 

Prof. Gershlick said “30-40% of heart attack patients also have a narrowing in another artery which at that point in time, isn’t causing a heart attack. So, it has always been difficult to know whether to treat the other artery at the same time as treating the blocked artery. Previous data has always been conflicting but there was some that suggested there may be benefits to treating everything all at once, so we designed a study specifically to look into it.” Previous UK studies such as the PRAMI trial also indicated benefit from treating everything all at once.

 

The CvLPRIT study, which was funded by the British Heart Foundation with support from the NIHR (Co-Lead Investigator, Dr Gerry McCann), was led by the team in Leicester and also took place in six other hospitals within England. The team found that there is a 50% improvement in the cumulative outcomes of death, heart attack, heart failure and the need for a repeat procedure within 12 months, in those who got both the blocked AND the narrowed artery treated.

 

These findings, which have yet to be considered within treatment guidelines, have the potential to change current medical practice for this group of heart attack patients.

 

Prof. Gershlick, who is currently presenting his team’s findings at the European Society of Cardiology, the biggest cardiology conference in the world, said “there needs to be a bigger trial to absolutely confirm these findings but Leicester again will be leading the way.”

Contact information:
Contact information
For media enquiries, please contact:

Communications Team
Leicester’s Hospitals
0116 258 8644
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Press release number
3526
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