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Parents' Stay Well Guide

StayWellGuide
Stay Well Guide for Parents

Help us make the festive season extra special for your family.

 The holidays are nearly here and we want to help you stay as healthy and happy as possible over your festive break. 

We’ve created a new guide, the Parents’ Stay Well Guide for Children Aged 0-9 Years which gives you all the information you need to get the right care for the most common health worries for children: 

  • Fever 
  • Head injury 
  • Diarrhoea and vomiting 
  • Breathing issues

Some simple home-based self-care could save you from hours in one of our busy GP or hospital waiting rooms, giving you and your family more time together at this special time of year. 

> Click here to download the guide <

By saving the guide to the home-screen of your phone/tablet/PC you can get to the right care advice for your child at the right time.  

We really hope you find this guide useful and wish you the very best and a happy, healthy 2022.

From,

Damian 

Dr Damian Roland 

Emergency Department Consultant, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust


Stay Home - Stay Well

A Parent's Guide to Self-care at home for children aged 0-9.


Fever

Fever is a natural immune response. If your child is still happy and playing there is no reason to be concerned.

If they are distressed give them the recommended dose of paracetamol and see how they are in one hour. Most of the time this will be enough and avoid you having to see a GP.

If your child is under 3 months old, or the fever has lasted 5+ days, call your GP for advice.

When to go to the Emergency Department at Leicester Royal Infirmary

You only need to come to our emergency department in the very rare event that your child has one of these problems, with a fever:

  • Blue or mottled skin
  • Very fast breathing
  • A rash that doesn’t disappear when pressed
  • Has had a fit, or
  • Cannot be woken.

Click to go to more NHS advice online

Watch a video on fever on Health for Kids


Vomiting and/ or Diarrhoea

Vomiting is very common and will normally stop in 1-2 days, as is diarrhoea which can last 5-7 days.

Children should stay home and continue to eat when able and take sips of drink throughout the day. If your baby vomits a large amount post-feeding, try smaller feeds, more often or a different feeding position.

If your child is making less wet nappies, has blood in their diarrhoea, has been vomiting for 2+ days, or had diarrhoea for 7+ days, call 111 for advice

When to go to the Emergency Department at Leicester Royal Infirmary

You only need to come to our emergency department in the very rare event that your child has:

  • Vomit that looks like coffee, is bright green or yellow, or there is blood in vomit
  • Swallowed something poisonous
  • Stiff neck and pain when looking at a bright light or has a sudden severe headache/ or stomach pain.

Click to go to more NHS advice online

Watch a video on vomiting and diarrhoes on Health for Kids

 

Head Injuries

We all know that children get bumps and bruises but head injuries are often more concerning.

Most minor injuries can be treated at home with an ice-pack held to the area for short periods of time, rest and paracetamol. It’s normal to have a slight headache, feel sick for up to two days, or be a bit sleepy. They can rest, but children should be supervised for 24 hours and avoid rough play and sports, in case of any change in symptoms.

If symptoms last more than two weeks see your GP or call 111.

When to go to the Emergency Department at Leicester Royal Infirmary

You only need to come to our emergency department in the very rare event that your child:

  • Was knocked out during the injury
  • Has frequent vomiting after head injury
  • You notice a persistent change in behaviour – not able to settle or memory problems.

Click to go to more NHS advice online

Watch a video on head injuries on Health for Kids


Breathing Issues

Across the winter months many children can experience rapid or noisy breathing as winter viruses circulate.

If your baby is still having at least half of their normal feeds and making wet nappies, or your child isn’t running a persistent high temperature the symptoms will normally resolve on their own in 2-3 weeks.

Call your GP or 111 if you are worried that your child is not being themselves, is feeding less than half of usual amounts, or has a persistent high temperature.

When to go to the Emergency Department at Leicester Royal Infirmary

Most children can self-manage minor breathing issues, but come to our emergency department if your baby:

  • Goes blue on their tongue or lips
  • Has long pauses in their breathing
  • Is having severe breathing difficulty – gasping for long periods.

Please remember if your child has a cough they should get a COVID-19 test as soon as possible.

Click to go to more NHS advice online

Read more information on breathing difficulties in Under 5s


Wellbeing

Around 1 in 8 children and young people experience behavioural or emotional problems growing up.

It can be difficult to know if there is something upsetting a child or young person, but there are ways to spot when something is wrong.

You know your child better than anyone so, if you’re worried, first think if there has been a significant, lasting change in their behaviour.

Look out for:

  • Ongoing difficulty sleeping
  • Withdrawing from social situations
  • Not wanting to do things they usually like
  • Self-harm or neglecting themselves

Remember, everyone feels low, angry or anxious at times. But when these changes last for a long time or are significantly affecting them, it might be time to get professional help.

Go to more advice on Every Mind Matters

Chat with a health professional for advice


Where to go for more information:

The 0-19 Healthy Together team from Leicestershire Partnership NHS Trust have a range of websites for children, young people and parents. The websites have a range of advice and support and information on local services.

  • Pregnancy to pre-school: www.healthforunder5s.co.uk
  • Primary school children: www.healthforkids.co.uk
  • Secondary school pupils: www.healthforteens.co.uk

Did you know that you can use NHS 111 for children too?

NHS 111 can help if you have an urgent medical problem and you’re not sure what to do.

For Under 5s - use the telephone service 24/7 by dialing 111

For Over 5s - you can call or go online to https://111.nhs.uk

Depending on the situation you will:

  • find out what local service can help you or get self-care advice
  • be connected to a nurse, emergency dentist, pharmacist or GP
  • get a face-to-face appointment if needed at an urgent care centre, GP or our emergency department.
  • be told how to get any medicine your child may need

Stay Home, Stay Well!